Natural Approaches

Center-For-Health-Science-ADHDThe healthy ADHD brain is an exciting place, likened to a feeling of being in a fast moving stream. Our thoughts are constantly refreshing, alive, stimulating. Our antennas constantly capture new images, sounds and ideas and our brains mold this flood of inputs into an entertaining and fast paced collage.

Given too much stimulation, however, we begin to feel like we are standing at the bottom of a waterfall, the weight of the falling water creating anxiety and a need to escape.  This stimulation can be from too much sensory input, or can be physical sensations that we experience when exposed to allergic foods, environmental toxins or pathogens.

As our anxiety builds, we begin to feel like we are getting pulled underwater. Thoughts of escape take over our thinking and we will do almost anything to get away.

We learn at an early age to adapt, to speed up our thinking through risk taking behaviors, by soothing, repetitive movements,  by repetitive sounds, and by hyperactivity. Or, we just shut down.

Drugs, particularly stimulants, help. Our brains speed up and, ideally, our ability to keep up with the thoughts, sensations and feelings gives us back our control.

Reducing the amount of incoming information is also an effective strategy. We do this by eliminating reactive foods, by reducing exposure to environmental toxins, by ridding our bodies of bacterial, viral and other pathogens, by getting adequate sleep, and by isolating ourselves using headphones and seeking out a less stimulating environment.

The ADHD brain has been linked to specific nutritional deficiencies, caused partially by our body’s reactions using up vital nutrients, and partially by genetics that affect our ability to absorb and convert certain nutrients.

What Can I Do?

Psychological therapies focus on teaching meditative techniques to quiet the overthinking and coaching patients on specific behavioral techniques to control overstimulation.  An equally important role for Psychologists is in helping the child or adult ADHD  to deal with the shame, guilt and damaged self esteem that is inflicted on them by  unthinking or poorly trained teachers, parents and society.

Dr. Reinhardt is a specialist in treating symptoms of ADHD.   to arrange a consultation in person at Long Beach, California or by phone conference.

Western Medicine
Western physicians “fix” ADHD with prescription stimulants such as Adderall®,Ritalin® or Vyvanse®.  These drugs do not offer a safe, long term solution.  ADHD cannot be “fixed”, it is not broken.  Stimulants may help focus with inattentive type ADHD but are of little value to the child with hyperactive type ADHD.  Stimulants are addictive and have long term consequences including increased risk of Parkinson’s disease in later life.  Your child’s reaction to stimulant drugs may be similar to the reaction to high caffeine drinks within 30 minutes of ingestion;  if you find this improves behavior please discuss this with an appropriate ADHD specialist.

Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine does not have an equivalent diagnosis for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. TCM does, however, offer treatments for symptoms of restlessness, poor concentration, hyperactivity, anxiety, disturbed sleep, and other changes in consciousness are associated with this condition. Typical TCM treatments that may help are designed to tonify Heart Blood, tonify Heart Yin, tonify the Spleen, open the Orifices, drain Heart Fire and correct Liver yin deficiency.  Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Western Naturopathy
Natural, drug-free approaches have been well studied and have been proven to help with inattention, impulsiveness and restlessness.  Specific herbal and nutritional therapies are directed at correcting deficiencies and eliminating reactive foods.  These approaches have substantial evidence of effectiveness.*

Can Drugs Help?

CHS DOES NOT consider use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, sleeping pills, amphetamines or tranquilizers to be appropriate or safe for children or adults with ADHD, except in circumstances where agitation and violence presents a clear safety issue. Stimulants may help over the short term with parent and teacher interactions but have been proven to slow learning, cause growth retardation, carry risk of sudden death and when used long term increase risk of Parkinson’s Disease.


What Else Can I Do?

CHS recommends 5 steps in your approach to inattention, distractability, poor focus and excessive energy:

1.  IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements.

2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes.   for guidance.

3. CHECK LABELS: Science has found a STRONG correlation between ADHD symptoms and hypersensitivities. Check labels and eliminate all artificial ingredients including preservatives, colorings, “conditioners”, “enhancers” and processed foods.  Several food colors and preservatives have been taken off the market in Europe because of their proven effect of causing hyperactivity.

4. CONSIDER a food rotation and elimination diet to identify foods and other substances that cause symptoms. Click Here for a guide to elimination dieting.

5. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms. Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.

Please be sure to leave your phone number and we will contact you.


Research

Fish oil: Three types of omega-3 fatty acids involved in human physiology are ALA (found in plant oils), EPA, and DHA (both commonly found in marine oils). Common sources of animal omega-3 EPA and DHA fatty acids include fish oils and krill oil. Significant research shows that fish oil can reduce triglyceride levels by 20% to 50% (Am J Clin Nutr 1995;61:831-6). The prescription form, Lovanza, is FDA approved for treating hypertriglyceridemia (Reliant Pharmaceuticals. Omacor package insert. Liberty Corner, NJ; December, 2004).

The EPA component of omega-3s has been found to be effective at depressive symptoms (Am J Psychiatry 2002;159:477-9, Arch Gen Psychiatry 2002;59:913-9,CNS Neurosci Ther. 2009 Summer;15(2):128-33.). Some clinical research shows that taking a fish oil supplement orally might reduce the risk of progression from sub-threshold psychosis to full-blown psychotic disorders (Arch Gen Psychiatry 2010;67:146-54). Taking EPA orally provides modest improvement in aggressive behavior and depression in women with moderately severe borderline personality disorder (Am J Psychiatry 2003;160:167-9). EPA modestly improves the mental state in patients with schizophrenia compared to placebo (Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2006;3:CD001257). EPA 500 mg orally, three times daily, provides modest, but significant reduction in the frequency of hot flashes compared to placebo (Menopause 2009;16:357-66). Limited evidence supports fish oil use for prevention of restenosis following angioplasy (Am Heart J 143:E5). Cochrane found benefit for asthma in children (Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;(2):CD001283). Omega 3’s help with atherosclerosis (J Am Coll Cardiol 1995;25:1492-8), diabetic neuropathy (Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1995;28:35-40), dysmenorrhea \, hypertension (Thromb Res 1998;1:105-12), and rheumatoid arthritis stiffness (Ann Rheum Dis 1990;49:76-80). omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for Schizophrenia:            (J Psychiatr Res. 2002 Jan-Feb;36(1):7-18; Schizophr Res. 2003 Aug 1;62(3):195-204;     Am J Psychiatry 2002 Sep;159(9):1596-8;    Int J Psychophysiol 1999 Dec;34(3):333-9; Schizophr Res 2001 Apr 30;49(3):243-51). Preliminary clinical research shows that taking fish oil orally improves cognitive function and behavior in children aged 8-12 years with ADHD (Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2002;26:233-9) and improves cognitive function, hyperactivity, inattentiveness, and behavior in children aged 7-12 years with ADHD (J Dev Behav Pediatr 2007;28:82-91).

GABA:  GABA concentration is reduced in children with ADHD (Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):750-3). Some parents report supplemental GABA is helpful with ADHD symptoms, although well documented studies have not been published. GABA has been shown to reduce blood pressure (Eur.J.Clin.Nutr. 2003;57:490-95; Clin.Exp.Hypertens. 2009;31:342-54). Preliminary clinical research shows that taking GABA daily for 2 months improves mental development, learning, vocabulary, physical function, motor strength and activity, and motor hyperactivity in children with cerebral palsy (Pediatr.Akus.Ginekol. 1977;(6):26-7) and is helpful with chronic bronchitis (Ter.Arkh. 1991;63:7-11). It has been shown to decreasse ACTH and cortisol levels in those with Cushing’s disease ( Probl.Endokrinol.(Mosk) 1991;37:28-31). Taking GABA improves attention, memory, and emotional reactivity in children with psychoorganic syndrome (caused by exposure to inorganic solvents) (Zh.Nevropatol.Psikhiatr.Im S.S.Korsakova 1978;78:1538-44). Research shows that taking GABA 200 mg reduces stress scores of tension, anxiety, confusion, and depression in people subjected to stressful conditions (Altern.Med.Rev. 2007;12:274-79; Biofactors 2006;26:201-8).  GABA does nort readily cross the blood-brain barrier.

Glycine:  Glycine is a conditionally essential amino acid that serves as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. About half of the inhibitory synapses in the spinal cord use glycine; most of the rest use GABA.   It is a required co-agonist for NMDA receptors. Glycine has a sweet taste and is well accepted in use with children. It is a standard ingredient in many pet and animal feeds due to its calming effects. Glycine has been shown to improve both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in multiple well documented studies (Biological Psychiatry 2003; Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 2001 Dec;4(4):385-91; Am J Psychiatry 1994 Aug;151(8):1234-6; Arch Gen Psychiatry 1999 Jan;56(1):29-36; Br J Psychiatry 1996 Nov;169(5):610-7). It has been shown to be of benefit in depressive and cognitive symptoms (The British Journal of Psychiatry (1996)169:610-617). Research on ADHD found benefit for neurodevelopment, attentional circuitry, and impulse inhibition (Current Pharmaceutical Design [2014]). Taking glycine sublingually may have neuroprotective effects if started within 6 hours after the onset of acute ischemic stroke (Cerebrovasc Dis 2000;10:49-60.). Preliminary evidence suggests oral glycine may improve episodic memory and sustained attention (J Clin Psychopharmacol. 1999 Dec;19(6):506-12). It may help improve recovery of the liver after alcohol-induced damage. Glycine might reduce the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by Kupffer cells. This effect leads to a reduction in inflammation, necrosis, and steatosis in alcohol-induced hepatitis (J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1998 Aug;286(2):1014-9). One study found,”Glycine improved subjective sleep quality and sleep efficacy (sleep time/in-bed time), and shortened PSG latency both to sleep onset and to slow wave sleep without changes in the sleep architecture. Glycine lessened daytime sleepiness and improved performance of memory recognition tasks. Thus, a bolus ingestion of glycine before bedtime seems to produce subjective and objective improvement of the sleep quality in a different way than traditional hypnotic drugs such as benzodiazepines.” (Sleep and Biological Rhythms, Volume 5, Issue 2, pages 126–131, April 2007).

Lithium Orotate: Low dose lithium has been studied and found to be helpful with depression and suicidality, to reduce rates of aggression in both humans and animals and to help with symptoms of anxiety, ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, alcoholism and dementia including its prevention. It enhances GABA release and may be helpful with sleep issues. It is antiviral and reduces blood glucose. It is a common ingredient added to animal feeds for its ability to reduce agitation and promote health. Low dose lithium, taken as directed, is safe and does not cause the harmful side effects of the massive doses given by psychiatrists.

Lithium orotate has been shown to help with alcoholism (Alcohol. 1986 Mar-Apr;3(2):97-100), Lithium might increase monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. It also enhances folate and vitamin B12 transport into brain cells, which might affect mood (J Am Coll Nutr 2002;21:14-21). Reliable evidence demonstrates that a low level of lithium— trace levels found in many water supplies— is effective at reducing suicide rates (J Psychiatr Res. 2013 Mar;47(3):407-11; BMJ. 2013 Jun 27;346:f3646; The British Journal of Psychiatry (2011) 198: 346-350; Biol. Trace Elem. Res. 25(2): 105-13, 1990; Nutr. Perspectives January, 1988:10-11; Br J Psychiatry 2011, 198:406–407). Low dose lithium has been found to reduce rates of aggression in both humans and animals (Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 1979, Dec.;299–303).   Lithium appears to work partially by inducing elevations in brain and erythrocyte glycine levels (Curr Alzheimer Res (2013) 10(1):104-107). Lithium seems to reduce blood glucose and may be helpful for diabetes and pre-diabetes (Biol Trace Elem Res. 1997;60(1-2):131-7; Diabetes. 1994;43(7):903-7). It is known to have antiviral effects, such as herpes simplex (Virologie. 1988;39(2):93-101). Lithium has been found to increase the volume of brain gray matter (Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Apr 1;73(7):652-7) and may reduce the risk of dementia (Br J Psychiatry. 2007;190:359-360.; Bipolar Disord. 2010;12:87-94.; J Clin Psychiatry. 2009;70:922-931; Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008;23:704-711). Low dose lithium appears to increase transport of the neurotransmitter glycine across the cell wall (Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012 Jul;1818(7):1737-44), a possible explanation of its effectiveness in increasing GABA release and treating symptoms of ADHD and anxiety.

Magnesium:  Children with ADHD seem to have lower magnesium levels ( Magnes Res 1997;10:143-8); preliminary clinical research suggests that magnesium might be useful for ADHD in children (Magnes Res 1997;10:149-56).   Magnesium might be useful in treating mild to moderate anxiety disorders (Curr Med Res Opin 2004;20:63-71). Taking magnesium orally seems to reduce anginal attacks in people with coronary artery disease (Magnes Res 1994;7:145-53); can decrease fasting blood glucose and improve insulin sensitivity (Diabetes Care 2003;26:1147-52; J Am Coll Nutr 2004;23:506S-509S; Am J Clin Nutr 1992;55:1161-7). Taking magnesium hydroxide plus malic acid (Super Malic tablets) orally seems to decrease fibromyalgia-related pain and tenderness (J Rheumatol 1995;22:953-8). Taking magnesium orally seems to prevent the recurrence of kidney stones (J Urol 1980;124:770–4). Treats metabolic syndrome: ( J Am Coll Nutr 2005;24:166-71). May be effective with migraines (Cephalalgia 1996;16:257-63; J Headache Pain 2000;1:179-86; Headache 2003;43:601-10). Magnesium intake is related to bone mineral density ( Am J Clin Nutr 1999;69:727-36). Taking magnesium orally seems to relieve symptoms of PMS.including mood changes and fluid retention (Obstet Gynecol 1991;78:177-81; J Womens Health 1998;7:1157-65). Taking magnesium 600-1000 mg daily can modestly reduce diastolic blood pressure (Int J Cardiol 1996;56:177-83; Am J Hypertens 1993;6:41-5). It may help with spasticity due to MS (Eur J Neurol 2000;7:741-4). It is useful for treating restless leg syndrome ( Sleep 1998;21:501-5).

Passionflower: Passionflower has been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety, possibly as effectively as anxiety drugs but without the addicition and adverse effects(Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007;(1):CD004518; Rinsho Hyoka (Clinical Evaluation) 1993;21:383-440; Fundam Clin Pharmacol 1997;11:127-32) and improves measures of sleep quality (Phytother Res 2011;25:1153-9). Evidence suggests the passionflower constituent apigenin binds to central benzodiazepine receptors, causing anxiolytic effects without impairing memory or motor skills (Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1997;58:887-91).

Theanine (L-Theanine): Theanine is the major amino acid found in green tea. Preliminary evidence suggests that taking theanine 200 mg might induce subjective feelings of tranquility in healthy people (Hum Psychopharmacol 2004;19:457-65). The antagonistic effects of theanine on glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors might provide neuroprotection with dementia (Neurosci Lett 2000;289:189-92). In animal models, theanine decreases norepinephrine levels (Chem Pharm Bull 1986;34:3053-57), decreases systolic and diastolic blood pressure (Life Sci 1998;62:1065-8), and suppresses the stimulatory effects of caffeine ( Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2000;64:287-93). there is evidence that suggests theanine might prevent the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting lipid peroxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) ( Exp Toxicol Pathol 1997;49:329-35).

Valerian Root:  Valerian has been shown to improve sleep (Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1982;17:65-71; Pharmacopsychiatry 2000;33:47-53; Planta Med 1985;2:144-8). It is helpful with anxiety (Settimana Medica 1980;68:437-7) and reduces the effects of stress ( Phytother Res 2002;16:23-7; Pharmacopsychiatry 1988;21:447-8). It increases GABA ( J Pharm Pharmacol 1999;51:505-12; Anesth Analg 2004;98:353-8). Valerian reduces PMS pain (Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2011 Dec;115:285-8). It helps symptoms of anxiety, irritability, insomnia, and agitation associated with opiate withdrawal ( J Clin Pharm Ther 2001;25:369-73)

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): Pyridoxine is required for amino acid metabolism. It is also involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism (15). In the body, pyridoxine is converted to coenzymes pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate, in a wide variety of metabolic reactions. These reactions include transamination of amino acids, conversion of tryptophan to niacin, synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the CNS, metabolism of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids and phospholipids, and the synthesis of the heme component of hemoglobin (AHFS Drug Information. Bethesda, MD: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, 1998). Vitamin B6 also plays a role in cognitive development through the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and in maintaining normal levels of homocysteine, in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, and in immune function. (Vitamin B6. In: Shils M, Shike M, Ross A, Caballero B, Cousins R, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2005). 11% of vitamin B6 supplement users and 24% of people in the United States who do not take supplements containing vitamin B6 have low plasma PLP concentrations (less than 20 nmol/L) (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2004. Am J Clin Nutr 2008;87:1446-54).   Deficiency can occur in people with uremia, alcoholism, cirrhosis, hyperthyroidism, malabsorption syndromes, congestive heart failure (CHF), and in those receiving certain drugs. according to the NIH Fact Sheet, B6 use helpful for improving cognitive functioning and memory in the aged (Arch Intern Med 2007;167:21-30; Am J Clin Nutr 1996;63:306-14), reducing cardiovascular disease risk by lowering homocysteine levels (J Intern Med 2010;268:367-82), and symptoms of PMS (BMJ 1999;318:1375-81; Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2007;96:43-4; J Am Coll Nutr 2000;19:3-12). It has been shown to reduce risk of kidney stones and treat oxalate type stones (J Am Soc Nephrol 1999;10:840-5). It is helpful with carpal tunnel syndrome and peripheral neuropathy (Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1984;65:712-6;Altern Med Rev 2006;11:294-329). It helps with symptoms of ADHD (Biol Psych 1979;14:741-51; J Learn Disabil 1982;15:258-64).

Zinc:  Zinc deficiency requiring supplementation may occur in severe diarrhea, malabsorption syndromes, liver cirrhosis and alcoholism, after major surgery, and during long-term administration of total parenteral nutrition (The American Pharmaceutical Association Practical Guide to Natural Medicines. New York, NY: William Morrow and Co., 1999). Taking zinc supplements orally might help increase weight gain and improve depressive symptoms in patients with anorexia nervosa ( Int J Eat Disord 1994;15:251-5; J Adolesc Health Care 1987;8:400-6). Taking zinc orally in combination with conventional treatment might modestly improve symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and impaired socialization in ADHD (Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2004;28:181-90; BMC Psychiatry 2004;4:9). Zinc deficiency is very common in those with ADHD ( J Child Psychol Psychiatry 1996;37:225-7; Biol Psychiatry 1996;40:1308-10). Preliminary clinical evidence has shown a modest slowing of cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer’s disease who take zinc supplements (S Afr Med J 1997;87:1116-9). Taking zinc orally reduces the duration and severity of acute and persistent diarrhea (Acta Paediatr 1999;88:154-60; Arch Dis Child 1997;77:196-200; N Engl J Med 1995;333:839-44) Taking zinc orally might help treat acne ( Acta Derm Venereol 1978;58:443-8; Br J Dermatol 1977;97:681-4; Eur J Dermatol 2000 May;10:269-73; Arch Dermatol 1977;113:31-6). Using zinc oral lozenges seems to help decrease the duration of the common cold (Ann Intern Med 1996;125:81-8; J Int Med Res 1992;20:234-6; J Antimicrob Chemother 1987;20:893-901). Using zinc toothpaste or mouthwash seems to prevent plaque accumulation, gingivitis, or formation of calculus (Guide to Clinical Preventive Services. 2nd ed. Natl Institute of Health, 1996; J Clin Periodontol 1996;23:465-70). Applying zinc topically seems to help treat herpes simplex infection (Br J Dermatol 1981;104:191-4; Med Hypotheses 1985;17:157-65; Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45:624-6) and zinc oxide (0.3%) in combination with glycine cream applied topically every 2 hours to facial and circumoral herpes seems to reduce symptoms such as blistering, soreness, itching, and tingling ( Altern Ther Health Med 2001;7:49-56). Taking zinc orally by people with cirrhosis seems to help treat muscle cramps ( J Am Coll Nutr 2000;19:13-5). Administering zinc parenterally immediately following post-head trauma seems to improve the rate of neurological recovery ( J Neurotrauma 1996;13:25-34). Taking zinc orally may help male impotence secondary to disease or medical treatment ( Lancet 1980;2:618-20; J Am Coll Nutr 1983;2:157-62; Cent Afr J Med 1995;41:312-5). Clinical research suggests that short-term dietary zinc depletion results in reduced serum testosterone concentrations ( Am J Clin Nutr 1992;56:148-57).


*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Symptoms

Have you or a loved one been

  • “Diagnosed” with ADHD?
  • Been told there are “behavior problems?”
  • Been told there are “boundary issues?”

ADHD symptoms are often mistaken as signs of defiance, laziness, compulsiveness and conduct disorder. An ADHD person may be seen as lacking social grace and appropriate boundaries.

Common ADHD symptoms may include:

Inattention:

  • Difficulty paying attention to details and tendency to make careless mistakes in school or other activities; producing work that is often messy and careless
  • Being easily distracted by irrelevant stimuli and frequently interrupting ongoing tasks to attend to trivial noises or events that are usually ignored by others
  • Inability to sustain attention on tasks or activities
  • Difficulty finishing schoolwork or paperwork or performing tasks that require concentration
  • Frequent shifts from one uncompleted activity to another
  • Procrastination
  • Disorganized work habits
  • Forgetfulness in daily activities (for example, missing appointments, forgetting to bring lunch)
  • Failure to complete tasks such as homework or chores
  • Frequent shifts in conversation and not taking time to let others finish their thoughts
  • not following details or rules of activities in social situations
Hyperactivity:
  • Fidgeting, squirming when seated
  • Getting up frequently to walk or run around
  • Running or climbing excessively when it’s inappropriate (in teens this may appear as restlessness)
  • Having difficulty playing quietly or engaging in quiet leisure activities
  • Being always on the go
  • Often talking excessively

Impulsively:

  • Impatience
  • Difficulty delaying responses
  • Blurting out answers before questions have been completed
  • Difficulty awaiting one’s turn
  • Frequently interrupting or intruding on others to the point of causing problems in social or work settings
  • Initiating conversations at inappropriate times
  • Excessive or inappropriate hugging and displays of affection

These are all signs of an ADHD brain suffering from mental overload. Natural, drug-free approaches have been well studied and have been proven to help with inattention, impulsiveness and restlessness. Specific herbal and nutritional therapies are directed at correcting deficiencies and eliminating reactive foods. These approaches have substantial evidence of effectiveness.*


What Can I Do?

CHS recommends 5 steps in your approach to inattention, distractability, poor focus and excessive energy:

1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements.

2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes.   for guidance.

3. CHECK LABELS: Science has found a STRONG correlation between ADHD symptoms and hypersensitivities. Check labels and eliminate all artificial ingredients including preservatives, colorings, “conditioners,” “enhancers” and processed foods.  Several food colors and preservatives have been taken off the market in Europe because of their proven effect of causing hyperactivity.

4. CONSIDER a food rotation and elimination diet to identify foods and other substances that cause symptoms.  Click Here for a guide to elimination dieting.

5. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms.  Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance. Please be sure to leave your phone number and we will contact you.


Can Drugs Help?

CHS DOES NOT consider use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, sleeping pills, amphetamines or tranquilizers to be appropriate or safe for children or adults with ADHD, except in circumstances where agitation and violence presents a clear safety issue. Stimulants may help over the short term but have been proven to cause growth retardation, carry risk of sudden death and have no long term proven benefit.


*Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Protocol

The Western Naturopathic approach to ADHD calls for adequate diagnostic testing and close examination of physical as well as psychological symptoms. Treatment of underlying physical issues is critical; correcting nutritional deficiencies, supporting key body systems and eliminating pathogens and environmental toxins is accomplished using phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Emotional issues are also explored through psychotherapy and other alternatives.

Allergies and hypersensitivities to certain foods are closely linked to ADHD symptoms. Dr. Reinhardt has found dramatic improvement in ADHD diagnosed children and adults who eliminate cow’s milk and milk products completely, including milk, yogurt, cheese and ice cream, as well as processed foods which often include the milk protein casein (which is not required to be listed on the ingredients!). Gluten free diets are also worth trying. It has been well documented that particular food colorings and preservatives cause ADHD symptoms. Although the FDA refuses to look at the facts, several such substances have been removed from the market in Europe due specifically to this ADHD effect. Mixed research shows excess sugar may worsen symptoms, although this is not the case with everyone.

Traditional Chinese Medicine does not have an equivalent diagnosis for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. TCM does, however, offer treatments for symptoms of restlessness, poor concentration, hyperactivity, anxiety, disturbed sleep, and other changes in consciousness are associated with this condition. Typical TCM treatments that may help are designed to tonify Heart Blood, tonify Heart Yin, tonify the Spleen, open the Orifices, drain Heart Fire and correct Liver yin deficiency.

The CHS ADHD Protocol

CHS recommends the following steps steps in your approach to inattention, distractability, poor focus and excessive energy:

1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all symptoms, medications and supplements. Eliminate any medications or supplements which seem to make symptoms worse.

2. TEST: Specific tests should be ordered to help find physical causes. You may need to be very directive (“pushy”) to get the correct tests, and many of the necessary tests will not be covered by your insurance.   for guidance

Recommended tests for ADHD symptoms:
CBC with Manual Differential White Count
CMP
Thyroid hormones and antibodies
Food Allergy Saliva Panel by Diagnos-Techs: Tests the most common food antigens – gluten (gliadin), milk (casein), egg (ovalbumin), and soy protein. http://www.diagnostechs.com
Gluten-Associated Cross-Reactive Foods and Foods Sensitivity by Cyrex Laboratories (Must be ordered by licensed professional)
Food Allergy panels by Meridian Valley Lab (Must be ordered by licensed professional) http://meridianvalleylab.com/
Food Allergy panels by Aletess Laboratory (Must be ordered by licensed professional) http://foodallergy.com/index.html

Note: ECG should be discussed with your physician PRIOR to starting a stimulant medication. These chemicals all have the effects of raising blood pressure, raising heart rate, and increasing the oxygen requirements by body organs, especially the heart.

3. CHECK LABELS: Science has found a STRONG correlation between ADHD symptoms and hypersensitivities. Check labels and eliminate all artificial ingredients including preservatives, colorings, “conditioners”, “enhancers” and processed foods.  Several food colors and preservatives have been taken off the market in Europe because of their proven effect of causing hyperactivity. Try eliminating all milk products and processed foods.  Consider a trial of a gluten-free diet.

4. CONSIDER a food rotation and elimination diet to identify foods and other substances that cause symptoms.  Click Here for a guide to elimination dieting.

5. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms.   Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help!  Dr. Reinhardt is a Medical Psychologist specializing in ADHD.  To discuss your situation with him, please call 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.

Please be sure to leave your phone number and Dr. Reinhardt will contact you.


Science

The Center for Health Science has studied ADHD for over 25 years. We have found that many (possibly most) ADHD symptoms are caused, at least in part, by environmental, nutritional and biological issues. Effective treatment requires an investigation of all of these areas.

The “diagnosis” of ADHD is used to describe a collection of behaviors and traits, however ADHD is not a “disease” but more accurately a syndrome, a recognizable collection of characteristics. This group of behaviors occurs in 9-20% of the population.  Although males are given the label more often then females, this appears to be the result of gender bias. Although poorly studied, ADHD traits never disappear. As a person faces life challenges (child, adult, or senior) they continue to “be” ADHD.

If not a disease, what is ADHD?
Interpretation of symptoms is very much “in the eye of the beholder.” Some researchers, such as Thom Hartmann, Ph.D., believe ADHD traits are the result of genetic variations that many people have that, in a simpler world, would have made them the most successful members of a tribe (adaptive behavior). This “hunter-farmer” hypothesis is presented in his many writings, such as “Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perception” ISBN 0-88733-156-4.

The allopathic medical community promotes heavy use of drugs to suppress ADHD symptoms, and does give limited endorsement of psychological approaches. It is important to note that the drugs used to “treat” ADHD have been poorly studied, but have been found to cause significant physical problems, and have NEVER resulted in any “cure.”

Significant research has shown that ADHD symptoms are often the result of allergies and food intolerances, reactions to certain chemical adulterants in food, problems with sleep, blood sugar dysregulation and a variety of other physical triggers.

Although ignored by the FDA, several chemicals used in food have been banned in many countries of the world specifically for causing ADHD-like symptoms. Several studies by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) found that certain artificial colors and the preservative sodium benzoate are linked to hyperactivity or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. UK food and beverage manufacturers have removed the six biggest offenders from all products for sale in the UK. The six colors are sunset yellow (FD&C Yellow #6), lemon yellow (FD&C Yellow #5, tartrazine), carmoisine (FD&C Red #3), ponceau 4R (Brilliant Scarlet, SX purple, C.I.  16255), quinoline yellow (FD&C Yellow #13), and allura red (FD&C Red 40). Unfortunately the US Food and Drug Administration has not acted on this science, and these contaminants are still added to many common foods (as of January 2010 certain Dreyers Grand Ice Cream flavors have them!)  Some of these are proven carcinogens. It pays to check labels.

A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009 found detectable levels of a total of 212 chemicals in blood or urine samples of everyone tested, 2,400 people nationwide. Little is known about the human health effects of most of the chemicals. ADHD, or toxic chemical exposure? Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical commonly used in plastic bottles and food containers, is one of those chemicals. Studies have shown It apparently has subtle but deleterious effects on the neurological and reproductive development.

Our individual genetics dictate how our bodies absorb and utilize particular nutrients. While one family member seems to do fine on a given diet, another member may exhibit symptoms of significant nutrient deficiency. Examples of this include findings that the amino acid glycine is an “essential nutrient” (needing to be supplemented) for some, but not for others. Interestingly, glycine supplementation has been shown to be effective in treating certain schizophrenia and ADHD symptoms in many hundreds of published scientific studies, yet it is rarely considered by allopathic physicians.  Vitamin deficiencies have been proven to cause other ADHD-like symptoms.

We accept Dr. Hartmann’s hunter-farmer hypothesis that many of us are genetically predisposed to ADHD-like traits. Whether or not these traits become “problems” depends on environmental triggers, including:

  • Sensitivity and exposure to certain airborne and food allergens
  • Exposure to inappropriate industrial chemicals, preservatives, and colorings
  • Specific nutritional deficiencies caused by genetic variations and declining food nutrients
  • Hormonal/metabolic issues and problems with sleep
  • Parenting styles that are destructive rather than adaptive
  • Educational styles that are destructive rather than adaptive

Natural Treatment Approaches

According to Western Naturopathic thought, ADHD itself is not a disease and has no direct treatment. It can, however, result in symptoms that can disrupt life. Natural Health Specialists focus on treating causes rather than suppressing the symptoms. Careful diagnosis, backed by appropriate testing, is necessary to identify contributing factors. Many believe that variations in amino acids and neurotransmitter levels are responsible for the more troublesome aspects of this personality type.  Allergies and hypersensitivities, pathogens and nutrient deficiencies all may contribute to troublesome behaviors.

Drug-free approaches have been well studied and have been proven to help with inattention, impulsiveness and restlessness.  Behavior therapy, nutritional approaches, and treatment of sleep issues have all been shown to be helpful. Specific herbal and nutritional therapies have substantial evidence of effectiveness, although have not yet been approved by the FDA for these uses.

Traditional Chinese Medicine does not have an equivalent diagnosis for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. TCM does, however, offer treatments for symptoms of restlessness, poor concentration, hyperactivity, anxiety, disturbed sleep, and other changes in consciousness are associated with this condition. Typical TCM treatments that may help are designed to tonify Heart Blood, tonify Heart Yin, tonify the Spleen, open the Orifices, drain Heart Fire and correct Liver yin deficiency.


Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS recommends 5 steps in your approach to inattention, distractability, poor focus and excessive energy:

1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements.

2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes.   for guidance

3. CHECK LABELS: Science has found a STRONG correlation between ADHD symptoms and hypersensitivities. Check labels and eliminate all artificial ingredients including preservatives, colorings, “conditioners,” “enhancers” and processed foods.  Several food colors and preservatives have been taken off the market in Europe because of their proven effect of causing hyperactivity.

4. CONSIDER a food rotation and elimination diet to identify foods and other substances that cause symptoms.  Click Here for a guide to elimination dieting.

5. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms.  Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help!  Call  a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.

Please be sure to leave your phone number and we will contact you.


Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS DOES NOT consider use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, sleeping pills, amphetamines or tranquilizers to be appropriate or safe for children or adults with ADHD, except in circumstances where agitation and violence presents a clear safety issue. Stimulants may help over the short term but have been proven to cause growth retardation, carry risk of sudden death and have no long term proven benefit.

Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.