Overview

Center-For-Health-Science-HypertensionNearly one in three American adults has hypertension. Many of the cases of hypertension are idiopathic (essential hypertension), meaning arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause. Secondary hypertension is hypertension with an identified cause.  Instructions on the correct way to monitor your blood pressure may be found by clicking on the Monitoring tab above.

Many causes of hypertension are well understood, although physicians often overlook these in selecting treatments.  Recent scientific discoveries are showing that viruses may play a part, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV). The Allopathic medicine chest is poorly equipped to deal with viral infections, and testing may be imprecise.

Conventional Western medicine focuses on suppressing blood pressure. “Even if one factor is initially responsible, multiple factors are probably involved in sustaining elevated BP. Heredity is seen as a predisposing factor, but the exact mechanism is unclear. Environmental factors (dietary Na, obesity, stress) seem to affect only genetically susceptible people. Treatments include weight loss and exercise, smoking cessation, diet: Increased fruits and vegetables, decreased salt, limited alcohol and drugs to lower blood pressure.” (Merck Manual)

Do not stop your blood pressure medications without your doctor’s approval!


Natural Treatment Approaches
 

The Western Naturopathic approach is focused on causes rather than symptom suppression. Blood pressure issues may be a response to pathogens and misdirected antibodies to those pathogens. Food and airborne allergies may drive blood pressure, as may dietary imbalances of key vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, blood sugar dysregulation and endocrine dysfunction.  Environmental influences and stress are known to deplete certain nutrients, exacerbating hypertension. Treatment focuses on correcting imbalances and deficiencies, treating pathogens and on altering diet and lifestyle choices. Hypertension responds well to such “alternate” interventions as hypnotherapy, meditation and massage therapy.

Traditional Chinese Medicine identifies and treats hypertension based on analysis of excess or deficiency symptoms, including:
1. Hyperactivity of liver-yang marked by headache or dizziness aggravated by mental upset, irritability, flushed face, tinnitus, dry mouth with a bitter taste, dream-disturbed sleep, reddened tongue with yellow coating and tight, rapid pulse. Treatment goals are calming the liver and suppressing exuberant yang.
2. Deficiency of qi and blood manifesting as headache or dizziness with lassitude, shortness of breath, palpitations, insomnia, spontaneous sweating, pink tongue with thin, white coating and tight and thready pulse. treatment goals are to replenish qi and nourish blood.
3. Deficiency in the kidneys marked by headache or dizziness accompanied by an empty feeling of the head, tinnitus, weakness of the lower back and knees, impotence or nocturnal emission, dry mouth, reddened tongue with little coating and thready and weak pulse. The treatment goal is to invigorate the kidneys.
4. Interior retention of phlegm-damp manifested by headache or dizziness with a heavy and tight feeling in the head, a feeling of fullness and oppression over the chest and epigastrium, loss of appetite, somnolence, corpulent tongue with white, greasy coating, and soft and slippery pulse. Treatment goals are to eliminate damp and dissolve phlegm.

 


Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS recommends 4 steps in your approach to hypertension:
1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements. CHS has prepared a “Symptom Checklist” for this–see tab above or Click Here for Printer Friendly Version to print out and take with you to your healthcare specialist.
2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes. Ask your doctor to run the basic labs prior to your visit, so he will have the tools needed to order follow up labs and refine his diagnosis.
3. EAT a healthy diet and lead a healthy lifestyle. Certain nutrients are less available in our foods due to modern farming methods. Additional nutrients are needed to combat environmental pollution and the stress of modern life.
4. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms. Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.


 Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Symptoms

Nearly one in three American adults has hypertension. Many of the cases of hypertension are idiopathic (essential hypertension), meaning arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause. Secondary hypertension is hypertension with an identified cause. Instructions on the correct way to monitor your blood pressure may be found by clicking on the Monitoring tab above.

Many causes of hypertension are well understood, although physicians often overlook these in selecting treatments. Recent scientific discoveries are showing that viruses may play a part, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV). The Allopathic medicine chest is poorly equipped to deal with viral infections, and testing may be imprecise.

Conventional Western medicine focuses on suppressing blood pressure. “Even if one factor is initially responsible, multiple factors are probably involved in sustaining elevated BP. Heredity is seen as a predisposing factor, but the exact mechanism is unclear. Environmental factors (dietary Na, obesity, stress) seem to affect only genetically susceptible people. Treatments include weight loss and exercise, smoking cessation, diet: Increased fruits and vegetables, decreased salt, limited alcohol and drugs to lower blood pressure.” (Merck Manual)

Do not stop your blood pressure medications without your doctor’s approval!


Natural Treatment Approaches

The Western Naturopathic approach is focused on causes rather than symptom suppression. Blood pressure issues may be a response to pathogens and misdirected antibodies to those pathogens. Food and airborne allergies may drive blood pressure, as may dietary imbalances of key vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, blood sugar dysregulation and endocrine dysfunction.  Environmental influences and stress are known to deplete certain nutrients, exacerbating hypertension. Treatment focuses on correcting imbalances and deficiencies, treating pathogens and on altering diet and lifestyle choices. Hypertension responds well to such “alternate” interventions as hypnotherapy, meditation and massage therapy.

Traditional Chinese Medicine identifies and treats hypertension based on analysis of excess or deficiency symptoms, including:
1. Hyperactivity of liver-yang marked by headache or dizziness aggravated by mental upset, irritability, flushed face, tinnitus, dry mouth with a bitter taste, dream-disturbed sleep, reddened tongue with yellow coating and tight, rapid pulse. Treatment goals are calming the liver and suppressing exuberant yang.
2. Deficiency of qi and blood manifesting as headache or dizziness with lassitude, shortness of breath, palpitations, insomnia, spontaneous sweating, pink tongue with thin, white coating, and tight and thready pulse. Treatment goals are to replenish qi and nourish blood.
3. Deficiency in the kidneys marked by headache or dizziness accompanied by an empty feeling of the head, tinnitus, weakness of the lower back and knees, impotence or nocturnal emission, dry mouth, reddened tongue with little coating and thready and weak pulse. The treatment goal is to invigorate the kidneys.
4. Interior retention of phlegm-damp manifested by headache or dizziness with a heavy and tight feeling in the head, a feeling of fullness and oppression over the chest and epigastrium, loss of appetite, somnolence, corpulent tongue with white, greasy coating, and soft and slippery pulse. Treatment goals are to eliminate damp and dissolve phlegm.

 


Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS recommends 4 steps in your approach to hypertension:
1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements. CHS has prepared a “Symptom Checklist” for this–see tab above or Click Here for Printer Friendly Version to print out and take with you to your healthcare specialist.
2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes. Ask your doctor to run the basic labs prior to your visit, so he will have the tools needed to order follow up labs and refine his diagnosis.
3. EAT a healthy diet and lead a healthy lifestyle. Certain nutrients are less available in our foods due to modern farming methods. Additional nutrients are needed to combat environmental pollution and the stress of modern life.
4. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms. Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.


Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Causes
It used to be believed that over 90% of cases of hypertension were idiopathic, with no known cause. Science has made rapid advances in this field, and we now know that hypertension can be caused by a number of conditions, most of which are treatable. The most commonly considered causes of hypertension are:
  • Diabetes: Diabetes can damage the kidneys and cause hypertension. A complete list of diabetes symptoms is available.  See the CHS Diabetes page.
  • Thyroid Disorders: This condition occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough (or too much) thyroid hormone, which can cause hypertension. Hypothyroidism may have various causes, including inflammation, surgery, radiation treatment, certain medications or pituitary problems. Hyperthyroidism similarly has multiple causes. See the CHS Thyroid page for a complete list of symptoms.
  • Sleep apnea: In this condition, often marked by severe snoring, breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep, meaning you don’t get enough oxygen. Not getting enough oxygen may damage the lining of the blood vessel walls, which may make your blood vessels less effective in regulating your blood pressure. See the CHS Sleep page for more information on sleep apnea.
  • Obesity: As you gain weight, the amount of blood circulating through your body increases. This puts added pressure on your artery walls, increasing your blood pressure. In addition, excess weight often is associated with an increase in heart rate and a reduction in the capacity of your blood vessels to transport blood. All of these factors can increase blood pressure.
  • Medications and supplements: Various prescription medications — from pain relievers to antidepressants and drugs used after organ transplants — can cause or aggravate high blood pressure in some people. Birth control pills, decongestants and certain herbal supplements, including ginseng and St. John’s wort, may have the same effect. Many illicit drugs, such as cocaine and methamphetamine, also cause hypertension.
  • Viruses: Current research has uncovered a strong link between certain viruses and hypertension. Coxsackievirus has been shown to cause cardiac inflammation and tissue death. Cytomegalovirus, the same virus that causes mononucleosis, may be a cause hypertension and atherosclerosis. CMV infects endothelial cells and causes them to secrete renin and proinflammatory cytokines, raising blood pressure. HIV may result in hypertension.
  • Bacterial infections: Including urinary tract infections.
    Fungal and mold infections such as Stachybotrys chartum
  • Autoimmune diseases: Including Goodpasture syndrome, lupus and others.
  • Nutritional deficiencies: Including Vitamin D, potassium, sodium, magnesium and others.
  • Food allergies and hypersensitivities
  • Atherosclerosis: Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fatty deposits called plaque on the inside walls of arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen and blood to the heart, brain, and other parts of the body. As plaque builds up in an artery, the artery gradually narrows and can become clogged. As an artery becomes more and more narrowed, less blood can flow through.
  • PCOS: Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by presence of multiple cysts on the ovaries, oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea, anovulation and regularly associated with excessive amounts of body hair (hirsuitism), excessive body weight, infertility, insulin resistance and hypertension.
  • Stress: Stress-Induced Hypertension: Stress-induced hypertension is high blood pressure associated with physical or emotional stress.
  • Conn’s syndrome: Overproduction of aldosterone, a hormone produced in the adrenal glands. This causes an increase in sodium and water retention and loss of potassium. This is the leading cause of secondary hypertension.  Symptoms include high sodium and low potassium levels, decreased renin release, muscle cramps and weakness, headaches, fatigue, and excess urination (especially at night). Note that these symptoms are common to other medical conditions.
  • Cushing’s syndrome: A hormone disorder caused by high levels of cortisol (hypercortisolism) in the blood. This can be caused by taking glucocorticoid drugs, or by tumors that produce cortisol or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).  Cushing’s disease refers to one specific cause, a tumor (adenoma) in the pituitary gland that produces large amounts of ACTH, which in turn elevates cortisol.  Symptoms include rapid weight gain (particularly in the face and torso), growth of fat pads along the collar bone and back of neck, excessive sweating, dilation of capillaries, thinning of skin, easy bruising, muscle weakness, male pattern facial hair growth, baldness, hypercalcemia, insomnia, reduced libido, impotence, menstrual irregularities, depression, anxiety, hypertension, insulin resistance, joint pain and osteoporosis.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: The parathyroid glands regulate levels of calcium and phosphorus in your body. If the glands secrete too much parathyroid hormone, the amount of calcium in your blood rises — which triggers a rise in blood pressure.
  • Pheochromocytoma: A rare tumor of the adrenal gland that causes too much release of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Less than 10% of such tumors are cancerous. Symptoms include abdominal and chest pain, flushing, increased appetite, irritability, nervousness, palpitations, rapid heart rate, headache, sweating, hand tremor, high blood pressure, and sleeping difficulty.
  • Renal artery stenosis: A narrowing of the renal artery, most often caused by atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia ( a rare disorder).  Deterioration in renal function may develop if both kidneys are poorly supplied, resulting in treatment resistant hypertension and eventual kidney failure.
  • Glomerular disease: Your kidneys filter waste and sodium using microscopic filters called glomeruli.  Swelling of these filters is called glomerulonephritis. If the swollen glomeruli can’t work normally, you may develop high blood pressure.
  • Hydronephrosis: In this condition, certain parts of one or both kidneys become plugged due to kidney stones, a tumor or other reasons. This blocks urine flow and raises blood pressure.  Some blockages resolve without treatment, but others require drainage or surgery.
  • Tyrosinemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of particular enzymes which prevents the breakdown of tyrosine which then builds up in the liver.
  • Many genetically induced diseases

It is important to consider the CAUSES of hypertension. Subtle symptoms that you may be aware of may hold the keys to finding the causes of your hypertension. CHS has developed a set of lab tests and questionnaires which look for often overlooked causes of hypertension.


Natural Treatment Approaches

The Western Naturopathic approach is focused on causes rather than symptom suppression. Blood pressure issues may be a response to pathogens and misdirected antibodies to those pathogens. Food and airborne allergies may drive blood pressure, as may dietary imbalances of key vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, blood sugar dysregulation and endocrine dysfunction.  Environmental influences and stress are known to deplete certain nutrients, exacerbating hypertension. Treatment focuses on correcting imbalances and deficiencies, treating pathogens and on altering diet and lifestyle choices. Hypertension responds well to such “alternate” interventions as hypnotherapy, meditation and massage therapy.

Traditional Chinese Medicine identifies and treats hypertension based on analysis of excess or deficiency symptoms, including:
1. Hyperactivity of liver-yang marked by headache or dizziness aggravated by mental upset, irritability, flushed face, tinnitus, dry mouth with a bitter taste, dream-disturbed sleep, reddened tongue with yellow coating and tight, rapid pulse. Treatment goals are calming the liver and suppressing exuberant yang.
2. Deficiency of qi and blood manifesting as headache or dizziness with lassitude, shortness of breath, palpitations, insomnia, spontaneous sweating, pink tongue with thin, white coating and tight and thready pulse. treatment goals are to replenish qi and nourish blood.
3. Deficiency in the kidneys marked by headache or dizziness accompanied by an empty feeling of the head, tinnitus, weakness of the lower back and knees, impotence or nocturnal emission, dry mouth, reddened tongue with little coating and thready and weak pulse. The treatment goal is to invigorate the kidneys.
4. Interior retention of phlegm-damp manifested by headache or dizziness with a heavy and tight feeling in the head, a feeling of fullness and oppression over the chest and epigastrium, loss of appetite, somnolence, corpulent tongue with white, greasy coating, and soft and slippery pulse. Treatment goals are to eliminate damp and dissolve phlegm.


Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS recommends 4 steps in your approach to hypertension:
1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements. CHS has prepared a “Symptom Checklist” for this–see tab above or Click Here for Printer Friendly Version to print out and take with you to your healthcare specialist.
2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes. Ask your doctor to run the basic labs prior to your visit, so he will have the tools needed to order follow up labs and refine his diagnosis.
3. EAT a healthy diet and lead a healthy lifestyle. Certain nutrients are less available in our foods due to modern farming methods. Additional nutrients are needed to combat environmental pollution and the stress of modern life.
4. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms. Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.


Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Monitoring

How to measure blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer:

The cuff is ‘pumped- up’ to a pressure of 180mmHg, compressing the brachial artery hence causing the artery to collapse once the systolic pressure (the maximum pressure exerted by the blood against the wall of the brachial artery when the heart beats) has been exceeded. At the point where the pressure of the cuff is greater then the systolic pressure, the artery has collapsed thus, there is no flow of blood through the brachial artery.

The valve on the pump is loosened slowly to allow the pressure of the sphygmomanometer cuff to decrease. Once the systolic pressure is reached (approximately 120mmHg in the ‘normal’ case), the brachial artery opens causing volatile blood flow, which cause vibrations against the artery walls. These noises are called Korotkoff sounds (named after their discoverer) and can be heard through a stethoscope as the pressure exerted onto the brachial artery falls. The blood flow through the brachial artery increases steadily, until the pressure of the sphygmomanometer cuff falls below the diastolic pressure (the pressure between successive heart beats, the low pressure), approximately 80mmHg. This is the point where the blood flow through the artery is laminar.

The Korotkoff sounds

The Korotkoff sounds are the sounds heard through the stethoscope as the pressure cuff deflates. The sounds are first heard when the cuff pressure equals the systolic pressure, and cease to be heard once the cuff has deflated past the diastolic pressure.

It is generally accepted that there are five phases of Korotkoff sounds. Each phase is characterized by the volume and quality of sound heard. The figure below illustrates these phases. In this example, the systolic and diastolic pressures are 120mmHg and 80mmHg respectively.

The Korotkoff sounds Phase 1: With the pressure cuff inflated to beyond the systolic pressure, the artery is completely occluded and no blood can flow through it. Consequently, no sounds are heard above the systolic pressure. At the point where cuff pressure equals the systolic pressure, a sharp tapping sound is heard. We recall that the blood pressure oscillates between systolic and diastolic pressure. At systolic, the pressure is great enough to force the artery walls open and for blood to spurt through. As the pressure dips to diastolic, however, the artery walls bang shut again. It is the closing shut of the artery walls that results in the tapping sound.

The Korotkoff sounds Phase 2: This phase is characterized by a swishing sound, caused by the swirling currents in the blood as the flow through the artery increases. Sometimes, if the cuff is deflated too slowly, the sounds vanish temporarily. This happens when the blood vessels beneath the cuff become congested, and is often a sign of hypertension. The congestion eventually clears, and sounds resume. The intervening period is called the auscultatory gap.

Korotkoff sounds Phase 3: In this phase, there is a resumption of crisp tapping sounds, similar to those heard in phase 1. At this stage, the increased flow of blood is pounding against the artery walls.

Korotkoff sounds Phase 4: At this point, there is an abrupt muffling of sound. The blood flow is becoming less turbulent. Some medical practitioners choose to record this point as the diastolic pressure.

Korotkoff sounds Phase 5: This is the point at which sounds cease to be heard all together. The blood flow has returned to normal and is now laminar. The pressure cuff is deflated entirely and removed.

Natural Remedies Herbal Remedies

CHS recommends 4 steps in your approach to hypertension:
1. IDENTIFY: Take a thorough inventory of all of your symptoms, medications and supplements. CHS has prepared a “Symptom Checklist” for this–see tab above or Click Here for Printer Friendly Version to print out and take with you to your healthcare specialist.
2. TEST: Have a complete physical and specific tests to identify causes. Ask your doctor to run the basic labs prior to your visit, so he will have the tools needed to order follow up labs and refine his diagnosis.
3. EAT a healthy diet and lead a healthy lifestyle. Certain nutrients are less available in our foods due to modern farming methods. Additional nutrients are needed to combat environmental pollution and the stress of modern life.
4. CHOOSE a Natural Product that matches your beliefs, physical issues and symptoms. Please visit HealthNotes.us for guidance.

Unsure what to order? Please call us, we can help! Call a CHS healthcare Professional at 714-886-9026, or  for guidance.


Statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat and cure or prevent disease. Information provided by CHS is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Any information given is only intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from scientific world literature. You are encouraged to make your own health care decisions based upon your own research of the subject and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Symptoms Checklist

Symptom Checklist

Name: _________________________________   Date: ___________________

Print out, complete, take to your healthcare professional

Click Here for Printer Friendly Version

Frequency: 1- occasionally, 2- nearly every day, 3 most of the day, nearly every day

Severity- 1- mild 2- disrupts normal activities 3- Debilitating

How long:  1- one or 2 weeks 2- one to 3 months 3- One or more years

Symptom Frequency (1-3) Severity (1-3) How Long (1-3)
Cognitive:
Fatigue
Anxiety, Fearfulness, Irritability
Sleeping Difficulty
Sleeping Excess
Brain Fog, Slowed Thinking
Anger, Aggressive Behavior
Behavior or Personality Changes
Mood Swings, Lability
Apathy, Reduced Interests
Hallucinations, Delusions
Frequent Sadness, Crying
Easily Distracted
Memory Loss
Changes in Appetite
Unplanned Weight Changes
Confusion
Immune Process:
Asthma, Cough, Breathing Trouble
Frequent Yeast Infections
Allergies
Frequent Flu Symptoms
Immunity Depressed, Frequent Illness
Heart, Blood, Circulation:
Blood Pressure High/Low
High Cholesterol
Heart Palpitation, Rhythm Abnormality
Nervous System:
Carpal Tunnell Syndrome
Restless Leg Syndrome
Numbness or Tingling Extremities
Difficulty Walking, Poor Balance
Spasm, Muscle Tics, Trembling
Senses:
Dizziness
Vision Changes, Blurred Vision
Light Sensitivity
Tinnitus, Ringing, Ear Sounds
Cold Sensitivity, Cold Extremities
Excessive Sweating, Night Sweats
GI System:
Abdominal Pain
Abdominal Swelling
Colic
Frequent Constipation or Diarrhea
Excessive Thirst
Indigestion, Heartburn, Gas
Weight Gain
Nausea
Weight Loss or Poor Appetite
Ulcers
Frequent or Decreased Urination
Reproductive System:
Absence of Menstruation
Irregular Periods
Breast Pain, Tenderness
Infertility
Painful Intercourse, Dryness
Hot Flashes
Loss of Libido
Erectile Dysfunction
Pain:
Migraines, Headaches
Bone, Back or Leg Pain (skeletal)
Joint Pain
Muscle Pain
Achiness
Muscle Cramps
Muscle Weakness
Skin, Hair, Nails:
Mouth Ulcers, Canker Sores
Sores in Corners of Mouth
Dry, Brittle Hair
Hair Loss
Dry or Itchy Skin
Tender or Bleeding Gums
Acne
Eczema
Pale Skin
Skin Rash
Edema, Swelling
Please List Any Additional Symptoms:
Diagnoses received in past 2 years (include chronic conditions): 
List all medications used in last 2 years
List dosage size (mg), frequency, how long taken (months)
How did the medication affect you? (good and bad)
List all supplements used in last 2 years
List dosage size (mg), frequency, how long taken (months)
How did the supplements affect you? (good and bad)
Family: List illnesses experienced by family members in last 2 years, or if deceased, in last 2 years of life